The Importance of Effective Recruitment & Selection

By Kate Broadley

Kate Broadley

Kate Broadley

Your employees are your most valuable asset, they’re also your greatest cost, so it’s important to hire the right people. So why then do employers have so many difficulties recruiting staff. Employing the wrong person for a role is not only time consuming but will affect morale and productivity and is a costly mistake to make.

Before determining who to attract and select for the role, it is essential that you have a clear idea about what the job requires and the attributes of the person needed. Some people look for the ‘best fit’, the individual who will aspire to the culture of that organisation and one who will understand the needs of the business. Traditionally, job descriptions have been devised to enable the organisation to effectively decide what skills are needed to fill the position. By doing this, the candidate has some knowledge of the type of role they will undertake and from this will enhance job performance as clear ground rules have been set from the beginning. Conversely, the lack of a competent job description will in effect, attract the wrong candidates.

Some tips to adhere to when recruiting include:

  • Develop and design a proper job description, listing the actual skills needed.
  • Design an advertisement that outlines what you are looking for and what the job will entail. You get much better results, if you advertise specific criteria that are relevant to the job. Include all necessary skills, and a list of desired skills that are not necessary but that would enhance the candidate’s chances of success. If you fail to do this, you might end up with a low-quality pool of candidates and limited choices to fill the position.
  • Select the interview panel carefully – make sure they understand the role, their responsibilities and are provided with the skills to participate fully. In my opinion further training should be provided to panel members to ensure this.
  • Fully prepare for the interview, as it provides a vital opportunity to focus on what candidates can offer your organisation. The interview process is an opportunity to express your vision, goals and needs and it is vital that the interview elicits responses from applicants that can be measured against your expectations for the position. If you don’t use the interview to effectively eliminate applicants who don’t fit into your culture, you might find yourself dealing with turnover, confusion and disgruntled employees.
  • When you choose, a candidate based upon the qualifications demonstrated in the resume, the interview, employment history and background check, you will land the best fit for the position. Base your decisions upon specific evidence rather than any gut instincts. If you hire people who can do the job instead of people you merely like, you will have higher productivity and quality in your products or services.

When you effectively recruit, and select the right employee, there is a domino effect. Your new hire will do their job well, employees will see that you make wise decisions. You will gain respect from your workforce, which in turn results in higher productivity.

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Making the call

By Justine Eden, Director – Eden Ritchie Recruitment

Justine Eden, Director

Justine Eden

I’ve got a secret rule when I employ for a role at ERR. I will only consider those applicants who pick up the phone to talk with me about a role.  This is for a few reasons – I’m of the opinion that it shows a level of interest in understanding whether an opportunity is for them.  It shows an ability to engage over the phone and build rapport and it ensures a better understanding of the opportunity, rather than just reading an ad and hitting apply.

In recruitment the phone is a key work tool and if you aren’t able to effectively communicate over it then you have limited chances for success in the industry. Also, I really don’t want consultants who rely totally on email as their main form of communication.  Call me old fashioned.

In these days of electronic job boards it takes minimal effort to lodge a job application, so how do you make yours stand out in a saturated candidate pool? Calling is an ice break, as humans in a digital world we still seek that human connection at a fundamental level – even at work.

So what should you ask when you call?  Let me start by telling you what not to ask – Is there someone acting in the role? (more likely to be asked for a role in government but regardless don’t ask this), how much does the role pay? (leave this to second interview stage). Don’t use the call as an opportunity to talk totally about yourself.  Use the call as an opportunity to demonstrate your genuine interest in them and the role.

Your questions will be situational and will reflect the role, organisation, location and sector.  Your questioning will be different if you are looking at a commercial sector role as opposed to a government role. Do your research before you call. Critically dissect the ad and or the PD and use that as a basis for any questions. The size and make up of a team or the scale and scope of operations could form the basis of your questions.

Any media releases or publications are also key research avenues and can inform questions around how the organisation is responding to current challenges.  Where the organisation wants to be in 12-24 months could also form the basis of your questions. Whether they are in expansion mode or consolidation mode. You could also what they envisage the successful applicant will look like – experience, qualifications, industry experience, the scale and scope they have worked at.

This sounds like a lot of questions, and I would suggest you pick your top 6, keep the call short – 5-8 minutes and don’t impose too much on their time.  Have a strong close, thank them for their time and let them know you look forward to the opportunity of meeting in person in the future.  Good luck!!

You will probably wonder WHY I am posting this …

WHY

One of my favourite quotes is by Simon Sinek, best known for popularising the “start with why” concept, when he says “people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it”.

I am often asked WHY I work in the recruitment industry and most people, even some of my friends and family, think my job is just selling – you may even be one of them.

Since joining Eden Ritchie, and indeed over my career in the recruitment industry, the number one thing that has inspired me everyday, my WHY, is seeing great candidates acquire even greater jobs. Making the countless reference checks, 1000’s of application reviews, and a non-stop flurry of emails all worthwhile 🙂

The reward of working one on one with candidates through the whole recruitment process and seeing them get the role they really wanted is my WHY. In order to assist my candidates to get ‘that role’ I work with them, as clinicians often find it difficult selling themselves, to fine-tune their applications and bring to life the great things they do, and have done in their career.

So, I have created a short overview “How is your application shortlisted” on the points I tell my candidates everyday to help improve the content included in their CV and supporting statement. These steps, I am confident, will see an application move that one step closer to short list and in turn interview.

Since joining Eden Ritchie, I have successfully managed the recruitment process for many senior and executive roles such as Executive Director Allied Health, Executive Director Nursing and Midwifery, Director Medical Services, Orthopaedic Surgeons, Principal Dentist (to list a few) and have received the below from candidates who are happy to provide a public testimony. Proof that my WHY is working.

If you ever have any questions on how to fine-tune your CV or application for a role, I am more than happy to help. Click here to contact me directly.

Jade Mortlock

Testimonials

I am emailing to thank you both for the excellent service you provided to me in the recent recruitment to the Executive role in the Darling Downs. Your timeliness and professionalism when responding to email and phone call queries and questions, the advice you provided in terms of both the application and interview process, and the consideration you showed in the follow up period post interview were nothing short of exceptional.   I would have no hesitation in recommending your services to colleagues and I will also have no hesitation myself in procuring your services in the future when recruiting high quality, experienced and capable employees.
Annette Scott, Executive Director Allied Health, Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service
It is with great pleasure that I can provide a gleaming testimonial for Jade Mortlock, Eden Ritchie. From first point of contact I found her to be personable, professional and able to answer all queries relating to the position I was applying for.  She has a genuine enthusiasm and passion for her role and was able to translate that to an efficient and stress-free process for me. I was very impressed that Jade always kept me informed of progress every step of the way, provided supportive guidance and was knowledgeable in all areas pertaining to my prospective position. Jade has been outstandingly helpful and I am truly thankful for her hard work and positive attitude. I would not hesitate to refer to or use her services again, I believe she has done a fantastic job.
Mark Dohlad, Principal Dentist, South West Hospital and Health Service.

Don’t forget to follow Eden Ritchie on LinkedIn as well as connecting with me here.