Permanent -v- Contract roles?

Andrea James copyBy Andrea James, Recruitment Consultant, FastERR team, Eden Ritchie Recruitment

As we progress through our career, we begin to understand it’s all about the opportunities that present themselves and the decisions we make along the way.  A common choice I see people having to make is the cross-road of “Permanent -v- Contract roles” … and I am asked which is better?

Ultimately the decision is what is better for you and what you are comfortable with. Some people prefer permanent roles as they feel they have more security and the other benefits such as annual, personal and long service leave whilst having a role you feel is “yours”.

As for contracting, well on a personal note, I was engaged as a contractor for over seven years and it was a great experience. I was often asked along the way “why don’t you just look for a permanent role?“  Whilst to most people this question would make sense, for me and at that period of my life contracting was perfect for me, and if I had not made the decision to contract I would not have the experience I now have across so many departments and roles.

Here is what I found when contracting:

  • You are in charge of your opportunities – as a contractor you get to decide what roles you wish to take and can have more control in the path your career takes.
  • The higher rate of pay – As a contractor you do not accumulate leave or have the permanency, however you are on a higher rate to compensate this and in most instances this rate is higher than if you factored in the same role with permanent pay and spread your salary across when you took leave.
  • Contracting is about being adaptable to your environment – As you are placed in different contracts, each environment is different. You need to be adaptable to your environment including different team sizes, personalities and drivers within that department and role. Within those departments there is also different policies and procedures and it is expected you have an understanding of these or know where to find them so you can align to them.
  • Open opportunities while you are on your contract – So many opportunities can arise while you are on a contract if you make a positive impact including permanent opportunities, extensions to your contract or being offered another contract within a different department. This can be of great benefit as long you honour your commitments to build the trust factor.
  • Adding to your experience – As a contractor, you will experience something different in each role. Different processes, systems, duties and through this you are also broadening your experience within each role. Be a sponge and soak it up.
  • You have more flexibility in your life – Would you like to take a month off to focus on the family or study? Would you prefer to work three days a week instead of five?  With contract roles you are able to tailor your life to the roles you accept bringing more flexibility to your life.

With these benefits, you may want to consider if contracting will work for you and your lifestyle. The only thing I will say is that as with anything, reputation builds trust so make sure you follow through with your assignments and give great customer service and build a reputable personal brand with employers.

If you are interested in contracting, then contact Eden Ritchie Recruitment on 07 3230 0033 or visit our website, LinkedIn and Twitter.

But I ….

Susanne FlahertyBy Susanne Flaherty, Government Selection Panel Consultant, Eden Ritchie Recruitment

Selling yourself to the employer is the name of the game right?

Obviously the point of applying for roles and going to interviews is to sell yourself, your skills and background to the employer. Similarly employers are wanting to sell their business, their opportunities and the benefits of employment with them to the right candidate.  From an employer’s perspective it is frustrating how frequently the right employer and the right candidate are not face to face in the same discussion.

Interviews with candidates with the wrong skills sets and background for the role at hand are pretty horrendous places to be. Candidates in the wrong seat at the wrong table typically are not able to answer the questions and the employer is not able to get the information they need to make an informed decision.

These are my current tips for applying for any role:

  • Apply for roles that are consistent with your skill set and background. If you are looking for a career change, plan it; do some study, look for entry level roles or roles that combine your existing skill set and new ones you are looking to develop. Look for opportunities to cross over into new fields taking some of your skills and hard work with you.
  • Always research the company, ask around and see if anyone in your network has experience with them. Search up the role title too, this can bring up ideas about the things you might need to consider when applying.
  • Always try to speak to a contact person. This is pretty tricky sometimes, but do your best. Plan your questions ahead of time and make sure you are not asking for information you should have read from the job posting or the career page of the website. Practice your phone call out loud to yourself beforehand or better, practice with a friend.
  • Be selective – this is really important. It wastes your time and the employers time if you are trying to sell something that they are not buying. There may be a role you are interested in and it’s a stretch for your skills and background. Approach asking about these roles from a developmental perspective, try to speak to someone about it, ask them what they would see as the ideal candidate and skill set.

It does happen that employers will be so impressed at interview that they offer the job to someone who has a totally different skill set from the one they set out to find. Realistically though, this is more likely to happen in the movies or to the friend of a friend of a friend. When it’s you, think through and plan your approach, remember the employer’s time is valuable and so is yours. People land amazing jobs, including the job of their dreams every day. Plan your approach, think about what you are selling, research options and don’t just wait for job ads.

Eden Ritchie Recruitment can help with roles in a number of amazing fields including IT and Government. Sharpen up your CV, plan your approach and find the right buyer.

You can contact Eden Ritchie Recruitment via our website and follow our team on LinkedIn and Twitter, or call on +61 7 3230 0033.

The importance of adaptability and resilience!

By Satia MarshSatia Marsh

Recruitment Consultant, Eden Ritchie Recruitment

When I look back over my 12-year career I think it is comprised of three significant stages:

  • Leaving university and entering the job market.
  • Progressing in my career and starting to understand what I really want from my career.
  • Starting a young family and how to balance sometimes conflicting priorities.

Speaking to other people, it was interesting to discover a lot of people share very similar experiences.

From the time of finishing my Business and Marketing Bachelor’s degree and entering the workforce (which is a huge learning curve in itself) I have come to realise that in each of my roles (even if based on a similar foundation to the previous), I found that I needed to develop a slightly different set of skills. Whilst each role gave me great insight into the different sectors I realised the importance of having a broad skill set that is required to function effectively in any role. In addition to experience and academic training I believe that some key personal attributes are just as important if you want to succeed in any job. Some of the most important attributes are:

  • Effective oral and written communication – to internal and external stakeholders at all levels throughout an organisation.
  • Tenacity and building your resilience – Never giving up when you are faced with a challenging situation, regardless of what that might be. Examples are multiple demands and priorities, challenging tasks, overcoming sales objections, stressful situations or conflict of any sort.
  • Flexibility – Hit the ground running in new sectors or new job roles e.g. the ability to adapt quickly and effectively to different working cultures and environments e.g. type and size of business, management and team structures.

The skills I have learnt have helped me to progress into the third stage of my working life. Becoming a recruiter in the past 12 months was the next critical change in my career. Thanks to a previous employer and mentor, I had a great introduction into the recruitment industry.

It has been an interesting journey so far and it is exciting to find out that I can follow a career where I am able to do the three things I am most passionate about – Human resource management, client relationship management and business. That said, I get the most satisfaction when I can matchmake businesses with candidates. The ultimate thing for me is to help people achieve their personal and business goals.

In summary, the critical factors are the importance of being adaptable and resilient. As the world continues to change due to technology evolution, economic factors and personal/life commitments the key to survival in the job market is your ability to adapt to change.

Satia

You can contact Eden Ritchie Recruitment via our website and follow our team on LinkedIn and Twitter, or call on +61 7 3230 0033.

 

The Importance of Managing Up

By Justine EdenJustine Eden, Director

Having been in the recruitment industry for a few years now (not specifying how many because it makes me feel old!) I have been able to sit back and watch many people progress up the leadership ladder. Some more successfully than others. There can be many factors impacting on success of course, but in many instances I have seen the inability to recognize the need to manage up, lead to failure.

Managing up can sometimes bring connotations of having to “kiss arse” – excuse the language, and I would argue that if this is what you interpret as managing up you are missing a key opportunity. Many leaders can be overly consumed with managing down and depending on the profile of your team sometimes this is necessary – but you need to ensure this isn’t a long-term strategy.

You need to focus attention on managing yourself – your career, your education, your professional portfolio to ensure you remain relevant and challenged. You of course will have an element of managing down through delegation and KPI’s to ensure deliverables are met.

But – how to manage up? Be clear on who above you this could include and then determine how often and how you will need to feedback to each person. In person communication is an effective way to build rapport and trust followed by putting things in writing to protect each other.

A good executive should adopt a no surprises approach in order to have the back of the people they report to and should also be able to determine what is communicated and what is not to prevent information overload. No Board wants hundreds of pages to read through, so your ability to grasp and communicate the key issues and expand if needed, is critical.

By managing up you increase your visibility and intel because you should be privy to strategic issues and be on the front foot to ask for the opportunity to work on key projects. You will better anticipate future challenges and therefore be able to better position your team to respond. Knowledge and networks are the power base of any ambitious executive but like anything require constant work and attention!

BBB (Best Business Books)

Compiled by Jade Mortlock

Many of the industries that we work in have specific mandatory training and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements. While these are imperative to continuously improve specialist knowledge, skills and abilities a personal commitment to broader professional learning and development is equally important. The team at Eden Ritchie Recruitment, who work across a number of industries, recently had a discussion about the best business books that we have ever read (and why) and we came up with the below list that we’d like to share with you. We would also love to hear the name and title of YOUR favourite business book.

Justine Eden – Director (https://au.linkedin.com/in/justineeden) The Rise by Sarah Lewis. I saw Sarah speak at a conference and bought her book, the connections she makes between business, sport and the arts resonated with me. As a bit of a “controlling perfectionist” myself reflecting on “failure” and “mastery” made so much sense in a hyper critical and connected world where we are too quickly judged.

Kim Ritchie – Director (https://au.linkedin.com/in/kimritchie) Feminist Fight Club by Jessica Bennett. I initially looked at this book due to the title but what pulled me in was the funny and dry humour she uses to give a warts and all view of woman in the male dominated corporate world and the tools (and stories) successful woman have used to try and become equals at the table.

Angela Anderson – Recruitment Consultant (https://au.linkedin.com/in/angelaanderson3) The Truth About Leadership by James M Kouzes and Barry Z Posner. This book presents theories and insights based on the authors’ decades of research and experience working with leaders, yet is very focused and readable and has some engaging stories. It highlights fundamental truths and values, and makes a great guide for leaders in any sector at any point on their leadership journey. I have also previously used their Leadership Practices Inventory with a management cohort in another organisation and found it was very effective and well-received.

Linda Parker – Executive Manager (https://au.linkedin.com/in/lindaparker1) Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. Rich Dad world’s goal is to increase your financial IQ, and bring you a world of possibilities, a world of learning, a world of understanding. A take charge world, where you’ll be equipped to take command of your finances and live a Rich life. I read this book during a personal/professional development course, and it was enlightening. I also read ‘Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff at Work’ – this was extremely useful for prioritising my work and refocusing on what really matters.

Angela Ng – FastERR Recruitment Consultant (https://au.linkedin.com/in/angconsultant) Good to Great by Jim Collins.

Elizabeth Duncan – Administrator Body Language: How to read others’ thoughts by their gestures by Allan Pease. This very amusing but insightful book details how what people say is often very different to what they feel.  It helps to identify subconscious cues and read body language in context.  As well as body language it includes speech patterns, image and appearance, dress, questioning techniques, interview strategies and TV marketing through body language. It is useful in the context of reading other people’s body language and also being conscious of your own.

Jade Mortlock – Senior Healthcare Recruiter (https://au.linkedin.com/in/jademortlock) First Things First by Stephen R. Covey. The principle-centred approach for prioritising gives you the confidence to make changes and sacrifices needed in order to obtain ‘happiness’. A series of user friendly, clear and concise graphics deliver the philosophy in effective manner while retaining the core message of time management and happiness.

Rebecca Ward – Chief Operating Officer (https://au.linkedin.com/in/berekaward) Blink – The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell. This great book discusses how we think without thinking – it’s about the decisions we make in the blink of an eye. Malcolm gives examples on reliable predictors for marriages that will and won’t last AND antiques that can be deemed as fakes just by looking at them! Some people have perfected the art of ‘thin-slicing’. Highly recommended!

Carmina Catahan – FastERR Recruitment Consultant (https://au.linkedin.com/in/carmina-catahan-847a433a) How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. Another classic best seller, I read this book ages ago but decided to read it again since starting with ERR. It’s such an amazing book as a reminder of the simple but very effective things that we tend to forget when trying to influence people and create long lasting relationships. There are a lot of facts and statistics too in this book about human behaviour, how people generally think, which explains some of the underlying reasons on why people do what they do. A lot of examples from people in history, their successes and how they became some of the most influential people known in history.

Ben Wright – IT Recruitment Consultant (https://au.linkedin.com/in/ben-wright-b8117318) Who Moved My Cheese by Dr Spencer Johnson. A motivational business fable. The book describes change in one’s work and personal life, and four typical reactions to those changes by two mice (Sniff and Scurry) and two little people (Hem and Haw), during their hunt for cheese.

Nicki McCaskill – Business Development Coordinator (https://au.linkedin.com/in/nickimccaskill) Speaking persuasively; Making the most of your presentations by Patsy McCarthy. Using real examples, Speaking Persuasively shows you how to hone your speaking skills in business and politics, in the classroom and in the community. It explains how to order your material, attract the audience’s attention (and keep it), control your voice and adapt your techniques for different situations. It also includes practical advice on making a successful business pitch, communicating across cultures and handling the media. Speaking Persuasively is for anyone who wants to become a more persuasive and more impressive public speaker.

Kate Broadley – Executive Manager (https://au.linkedin.com/in/katebroadley) The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R Covey. An oldie but a goodie. Written by an internationally respected authority on leadership back in 2004, Stephen Covey’s first groundbreaking novel implies true success is founded on personal and professional development habits like prioritisation, empathy and self-renewal. I always go back to this book when I am feeling a bit stale and need a bit of a boost in terms being the best you can be.

Please get in touch with your ER recruiter either via email or their LinkedIn address (above) and let them know what your favourite is. We look forward to hearing from you!