The Queensland Election is Looming …

1D6A0555 Written by Kate Broadley

… And with this brings the impact of the caretaker conventions.

The Queensland Premier, Campbell Newman is yet to announce the date for the State election, but what we do know is that it will be sometime soon. By convention, the government will then enter caretaker mode until the result of the election is known and, if there is a change of government, until the new government is appointed. Of course the normal business of government will continue during the caretaker period, however major approvals and decision are normally deferred.

Eden Ritchie Executive Scribing and Report Writing Services offer independence from an external third party, transparency, reliability of the interview process and fast turnaround of recruitment and selection documentation to the highest standards. Given the election will be called soon… now is the time to act and finalise those outstanding selection processes!!!

Our services include:

  • Screening applicants
  • Shortlisting of applications
  • Scribing for interviews, shortlisting meetings and panel deliberations
  • Providing immediate professional advice where difficult issues arise
  • Development of selection tools including effective interview questions, benchmarks or work tests
  • Reference checks
  • Criminal history and medical checks

For more information, contact Kate Broadley on 3230 0018 or 0448 858 178 or email kate@edenritchie.com.au.

Remember to visit our website and follow Eden Ritchie on LinkedIn to stay up to date with more industry news, careers and Eden Ritchie events.

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A Moment In Time Can Change All That You Hold True

Written by Justine Eden

JustineAn innocent moment at home, could have lead to me burning my house down. It was confronting and made me question a lot of what I had placed value on…

My life is busy – but as it is for most of us. I always seem to be chasing that elusive extra 10 minutes in the day, the extra time that would make a difference between being on time or being late – again.

I’m at my best when I’m flat out – yes I can be a stress head perfectionist, but put under pressure – I perform at my best. I’ve always rated my ability to multitask and smirked at those of the opposite sex who appear incapable of multitasking.

I remember talking with a good friend of mine – an executive coach who drives performance through self improvement – who stated point blank that multitasking was ineffective.

He went on to say that you were better off focusing on one thing at a time and doing it right before attempting to move onto what you have to do next. I smiled and nodded at the time and thought – “no wonder you say that – you are a man and therefore unable to multitask anyway”…

But the other night as I listened to my daughter practice her mandarin for an upcoming language contest, and started preparing dinner – at the same time a call came through from a client – which of course I accepted…. We spoke for around 10 minutes and when I turned around the house was full of smoke from the pan heating on the element filled with olive oil, which I had totally forgotten about.

It struck me at that point how I hadn’t really been fully focused on any one thing and probably had my attention spread across 4-5 different things at the same time.   How effective was I really? How effective is multitasking ? I had the mantra of do it once and do it right drilled into me from birth, but the pace of life had made multitasking seem like the only way of possibly getting everything done.

I don’t think this “old dog” will totally learn new tricks. The adrenalin rush of getting it all done keeps me on the edge, but I am focusing on being in the moment and present. Meditation is top of my list of things to start and keep doing. Making notes keeps me on track and means I stress less about forgetting something. Paying full attention to the person in front of me – rather than letting my mind wander across all of the things I need to do is something I am practicing hard at.

Old habits are hard to change – but the wake up call was an opportunity for me to reassess……..

The Dark Side of the “Struggle to Juggle”

By: Kate Broadley

1D6A0555Last week I wrote about the some of the benefits for employers and employees of using flexible work practices. But I thought to be fair, I should talk about the challenges, or the dark side as I call it.

In reality, flexibility does not work in all workplaces. Yes I work from home, but not everyone can do this. One must be willing to work independently and alone. Of course there are fewer distractions and I get to avoid those unnecessary interruptions, but there is no office vibe or excitement, and no one to exchange ideas with. While this works for me, there are times in a business environment when your expertise is required and missed in the workplace, if you are not there! The type of work I do requires at times a quiet place where I can analyse information and write reports, so the home office is the perfect place. On the other hand, a lot of work requires you to be in the very hub of activity in the workplace. I don’t get distracted at home, but others find it impossible to focus.

I work in a small business with two fantastic directors, who are comfortable communicating with me through various mediums other than face to face, and who support and trust me to deliver what I need for the business. It helps that my goals and outcomes are clearly measurable. This has not come about overnight and I think it is unfair for employees to expect this. It has been created over time and built through trust, delivery of quantifiable and measurable outcomes, and some ups and downs along the way. In my opinion, without mutual trust, support and measurable outcomes, this type of flexibility cannot work.

And finally, I am never off the grid, given all the wonderful technological gadgets we now have access to, which create the opportunity for greater flexibility to fit work in and around all of life’s other activities. But whether technology has enabled greater freedom from the workplace is debatable. It is easy for working “anywhere, anytime” to turn into working “everywhere, all the time”. I check my emails all the time, I hate to admit this, but often before breakfast and even when on holidays. I am not expected to do this, but it helps me manage my workload. I like to multi-task, but does this simply exacerbate the “struggle to juggle” and put us at risk of burnout, which is one of the very things, flexible work practices seek to avoid?